PUBLIC HEALTH ALERT

Town of Dayton, Indiana

June Update

 

With our lives pretty much turned upside down these last few months, we want to make sure you’ve noticed the infrastructure improvements and changes going on around town. Thanks to the state’s Community Crossroads Matching Grant program, more of Dayton’s streets are being improved. The improvements that are in progress on Harrison Street and Pennsylvania include very significant work with milling of the asphalt and repaving, sidewalks and new approaches. A part of Shady Lane and parts of both Dayton Road North and Dayton Road South will also be milled and repaved. Prairie Lane, Conjunction, College, Market, and Ricks Drive all have or will receive crack sealing and a sealer application. The addition of these projects to those already completed will result in Dayton soon having over half of the town's 8 miles of roads repaved.

 

If you venture out on Dayton Road South you’ll see construction work progressing as utilities are extended to the Baker Farms Subdivision. Once he has installed the utilities, the developer will start building roads throughout the subdivision. Look for new homes to appear in the months ahead.

 

We have a vacancy on the town council due to the resignation of Al Beavers for health reasons. (See the box on the opposite side of the page for details on filling the position.) Other town business that is in progress but has been slowed down due to the meeting restrictions from the Covid-19 virus is the annexation of the new TIF area bordered by Hine Drive, Haggerty, I-65, and Dayton Road. The revisions of the Golf Cart Ordinance are also still pending. 

 

The regular meeting of the town council which would normally be held on June 8th at 7 has been cancelled, and the council will hold a special telephone meeting to open bids for the Town’s Trash Service at 4 pm that day. At 4:30, the council will meet privately in Executive Session per 5-14-1.5-6.1(b)(10) “to consider the appointment of a public official”. They will consider  the letters of interest submitted for the new council seat. A telephone meeting for essential business, including appointing a new council member will be held on June 10th at 4.

Your council members continue to encourage input from the community.  Our contact info can be found here, and we welcome  your thoughts and comments on upcoming issues or any issue at all. We are here for you.

 

Stay safe, Dayton!

Town Updates

Monday, June 8th Meetings 

-The Dayton Town Council will hold a special telephone meeting at 4 pm for the purpose of opening the Trash and Recycling Bids. A phone number to listen live will be provided here about 10 minutes before the meeting. 

-The 4:00 meeting will be followed at 4:30 with a closed  Executive Session per 5-14-1.5-6.1(b)(10) “to consider the appointment of a public official”. No decision will be made or vote taken at this meeting. Letters of interest will be shared here.

WARD 2 COUNCIL SEAT VACANCY

On June 10th, the remaining 4 members of the town council will vote to fill the council seat recently vacated by Al Beavers. An interested person must be a registered voter and a resident of Ward 2. Additional qualifications and disqualifications for holding public office an be found in the linked Candidate Guide. Please send letters of interest to a member of the council before noon on June 8th. Contact info can be found here.

Special Meeting

The Dayton Town Council will hold a special telephone meeting on Wednesday June 3rd, 2020 at 7 pm for the purpose of setting parameters and rules for current and future road projects. A phone number will be provided here in the minutes before the meeting for those wishing to listen live, and will also be recorded. Citizens are encouraged to contact any council member to share thoughts and concerns on this and other topics.

Thanks to all who listened live. The recording from the phone meeting and be found here:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/v72989vxng41ev6/2020%2006%2003%20Special%20Meeting.mp4?dl=0

MAY COUNCIL MEETING UPDATE

The Dayton Town Council will hold a meeting by teleconference on May 13, 2020 at 4 pm. No public comments will be heard, but if you would like to listen in, check back here on the 13th after 3:50 for a call-in number. The meeting will also be recorded and shared afterward.

Thanks to all who listened live. The recording of the phone meeting can be found here:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/36roa13eww4ih00/2020%2005%2013%20Dayton%20Council.mp4?dl=0

 

 

William Bush Started It

A long, long time ago …

…the first settlers arrived in Dayton. It was 1825 when William Bush and others settled here, and Bush probably sold the first lots about 1827, the year the town celebrates as its founding. Two years later, the town was officially platted, in two parts. In 1829, both Dr. Timothy Horram, who owned land adjoining Bush’s, and William Bush decided it was time to file a plat. The two men used the same surveyor and filed their plats on the same day, September 16, 1829. Bush called his plat Marquis (de), with all lots lying along the south side of the state road now known as Indiana 38.  Dr. Horram called his plat Fairfield, with all lots lying north of the road. Bush’s plat for Marquis was entered first (Deed Book A, p. 381), earning him the honor of town founder. Horram’s plat for Fairfield is recorded on the following page (Deed Book A, p 382.). The name Marquis may never have been used, but for some reason early local histories often get it backward, claiming that the town was first called Fairfield by William Bush, and later Marquis by Horram.

In a deed recorded October 5, 1830 (at Deed Book B, page 278), David Gregory platted an addition to the town of Fairfield, with all lots lying west of Conjunction St (alongside Fairfield) and north of the state road (across from the west half of Bush’s Marquis plat).

When the growing town applied for a post office, it was denied the use of the name Fairfield because there was already a post office by that name in Indiana, a dilemma shared with several other aspiring Fairfields around the state. Legend says Gregory offered to donate a lot for a school if the town would take the name Dayton, after the prosperous Dayton, Ohio, in the area from which Gregory and others had come. On April 19, 1831, the Dayton post office was established, and on July 5, 1831, Gregory deeded a lot for a school (lot 19; Book 58, p. 172), although it was not, as legend says, exactly on the spot where the school stands today. It was on a lot directly in front of today’s school location but facing Main Street. The one-room school was built far back on the lot, and the land where the school stands today was also Gregory land at the time, making it essentially the same location. As new buildings were erected, they were located behind the existing building, on the north edge of the town.

 

Much has happened in Dayton since then…

Susan Clawson

© 2019 Town of Dayton, Indiana.